H.P. Lovecraft

 

 

Lovecraft_smiling

Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born on 20 August, 1890. So the anniversary of his birth is just passed.

I see that one Tumblr blogger offered a birthday ‘tribute’ which included calling HPL ‘crazy’, an ‘insane xenophobe‘ and scoundrel. The blogger professed to be a fan of Lovecraft’s writings, so maybe in today’s climate he felt the need to denounce Lovecraft for his “sins” of wrongthink and ‘hate speech’ towards foreigners and ‘People Of Color.’

No doubt the name-calling Lovecraft fan is aware of HPL’s being ritually denounced by the Science Fiction ‘Community’ in the recent past, so he felt the necessity to follow suit and express his ideological purity by throwing a few appropriate insults at Lovecraft.

But how long will that half-measure suffice to keep the baying hounds from the door? Soon there might well be burnings of Lovecraft’s books, or, watch politically correct Amazon (and the rest) announce that they will no longer carry his books because they are hate speech; they are offensive and inflammatory, and they don’t reflect the new ‘truths’ of 2017, so they must go.

Among Lovecraft’s offenses against the gods of political correctness was sympathy for the Confederacy, as well as a paean to none other than General Robert Edward Lee,  a man Lovecraft unabashedly admired. But then in Lovecraft’s time, and even until not so long ago, many Americans from all regions admired General Lee, not just for his military prowess but for his character. Schoolchildren in public schools, in the Northern states as well as the South, were taught that Lee was one of our great men. It was not unusual for a Northerner to admire General Lee, and more to the point, people still had the freedom of thought and of speech to express that feeling openly, without fear of repercussions: of being denounced as a bigot, hater, Nazi, or fascist, or ‘Supremacist.’ Those days appear to be gone, unless something changes for the better, and soon.

HPL and all the past generations are turning in their graves.

Was Lovecraft a ‘White supremacist’? Because he will, of course, be called that by the mad-dog rabble that is out there now. Lovecraft was not a ‘White supremacist’, though he called himself an Anglo-Saxonist — that is no doubt a thought-crime and hateful these day.

I’ll just leave you with one quote (of many possible quotes) from HPL, one which seems to speak to our present situation:

In my opinion the paramount things of existence are those mental & imaginative landmarks — language, culture, traditions, perspectives, instinctive responses to environmental stimuli, &c.– which give to mankind the illusion of significance & direction in the cosmic drift. Race & civilisation are more important, according to this point of view, than concrete political or economic status; so that the weakening of any racial culture by political division is to be regarded as an unqualified evil — justifiable only by the most extreme provocation.”

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “H.P. Lovecraft

  1. I’m sure HP Lovecraft would DEMAND that his books not be put before the scum that hates him for his European Racial Heritage. These dessicated mongrels hardly read anyway. The high tones and fancy verbiage may as well be Greek to this kind of scum. Let them “celebrate” mad black women. Those pulp scribbles will be the homes of maggots at the landfill. HP Lovecraft is only for the erudite and the imaginative. Those mongrels to whom the wheel was never even an idle thought, would NEVER APPRECIATE such high minded insightful tales of mystery and wonder as Lovecraft. Alcohol, hallucinogens and loud screams of babble and nonsense are what that rabble like after all.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Joshua, you’re probably right that HPL never would have imagined that the people who now ‘hate’ him would read his works at all. I think he was writing for a specific audience, people who were on his level, and those who shared the same heritage culturally and racially. Today people call that ‘elitist’ but it was probably an attitude that many writers had then; few wanted to be all things to all people.
    -VA

    Like

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