The booming South

According to the Washington Times, the South is still ‘booming’ economically, and continues to be a magnet for non-Southrons wanting to find a more congenial home.

The popular wisdom has it that most of the newcomers to the South are ‘conservative’ and looking for a new home with lower taxes, pleasanter weather, and ‘smaller government.’ This may be true in many cases, or even most cases. But is a continuing wave of migration good for the South, or more specifically for the people of the South, that is, the ‘heritage Southrons’ if I may use that term?

And before I go further, I don’t write from any malice towards people from the North. My mother was from the North, and I’m no stranger to that culture.

Large-scale migration of people from outside the South began in earnest in the 1970s. When I search on this subject, the vast majority of hits I get are strictly about black migration back to the South in the 20th century. However the influx of Whites from outside the South seemed most visible in the 1970s and later, and with the ‘tech’ industry (Dell, et al) later. I don’t know that the migration ever really slowed down; the presence of Northerners (including many from Western States) is very evident.

Certainly there are ‘conservatives’ migrating there, or at least conservatives in the broadest sense — but no matter how conservative their politics may be they do change the culture of the South, and have changed it.

To be fair, some of the changes were the result of the omnipresent and intrusive ‘mass media’, with the requisite load of propaganda. The media also exerted a big effect on local ways of speaking — the Southron accent has all but vanished amongst most of the younger generations (Gen X on downward). This I find sad.

When I studied linguistics in college there was a lot of discussion of how language, that is, the language we use, affects our thought processes.
I am no professional linguist, but I’m very familiar with the differences between the Southron dialect, as it existed for centuries, and the sort of mainstream American English accents, as modeled in the media. There used to be considerable differences between traditional Southron dialect speakers and Northern American English speakers, though those differences are quickly being erased, with a consequent loss of a great deal of color and nuance in the English language.

There are of course pockets of people here and there in the South who retain much of their dialect and vocabulary, but they are becoming harder to find. The Southron accent has long been an object of ridicule from non-Southrons, with a prevailing attitude that the accent and dialect sound ‘backward’ or ignorant. That attitude has been very harmful and may explain the wish of some Southern-born people to lose or at least downplay their ‘drawl.’

Language is not the only thing that has been changed by the ongoing influx of people from outside the South; the culture of the South was always very Christian by comparison with the rest of the country. Of course the Bible Belt for a long time included parts of the Midwest and the Western, more rural areas, but the South held out the longest as far as their Christian culture was concerned. Now, though, with the great falling-away in most of the Western world, the influence of Christianity is waning in the South, and the presence of so many non-churched people from outside plays a part.

My state, Texas, is these days often erroneously lumped with ‘the Southwest’, though it used to be considered a Southern state — by virtue of its having been settled mostly by Southrons, as well as because of its solid ‘Bible belt’ status, and very importantly, as being part of the Confederacy. Texas has much more in common with the South than with the ‘Southwest’, that is, New Mexico, Arizona, California, et al.

Texas is obviously on the verge of changing to a far less conservative and traditional place than it used to be. I find this tragic, because it need not have happened, yet the change may be irrevocable, just as the changes to our country as a whole may never be reversed.

And yet — those who look only at economics and see ‘booming’ states in the South don’t ever look at the far more important ramifications of this willy-nilly, top-down imposed change: the loss of the culture, of the heritage, and above all, a change in the very people of the South. People, as I’ve said ever since I started blogging, are not interchangeable. The people make the place. The place, once populated by different people — no matter how ‘conservative’ or Republican they are, will never be the same. And a population of people with vastly different languages, religions, and cultures will eradicate the places we once knew and loved, and will make a mockery of the sacrifices of our forefathers. But this is of no moment to the decision makers, who make these decisions over our heads in our ”democracy” demockracy.

But then we’re not supposed to notice, much less question or mention these things. In parts of Europe it’s criminal to criticize such changes, or even to mention them. And how much longer will we be permitted the luxury to speak or write about it?

8 thoughts on “The booming South

  1. “And yet — those who look only at economics and see ‘booming’ states in the South don’t ever look at the far more important ramifications of this willy-nilly, top-down imposed change: the loss of the culture, of the heritage, and above all, a change in the very people of the South. People, as I’ve said ever since I started blogging, are not interchangeable. The people make the place. The place, once populated by different people — no matter how ‘conservative’ or Republican they are, will never be the same. And a population of people with vastly different languages, religions, and cultures will eradicate the places we once knew and loved, and will make a mockery of the sacrifices of our forefathers. But this is of no moment to the decision makers, who make these decisions over our heads in our ”democracy” demockracy.”

    Indeed! Worshipping the Golden Calf. As if to say, so long as the ‘economy’ is good then so are we. Civic Nationalism is suicide, Not interchangeable!

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  2. People, as I’ve said ever since I started blogging, are not interchangeable.

    I can verify the truth of the assertion that you have been saying this ever since you started blogging.

    “William Henry Whitlow” recently wrote an article over at Identity Dixie that pretty well sums up my position on this Northern and Western migration to the Soutern States, invariably bringing their fallacious notions of conservatism, religion and good government – the same notions that contributed to creating the hell holes they’re trying to escape – with them. As I too have said many many times over the years, “leave your politics at the border, humble thyself and learn of us.” Of course that is never going to happen with most of these interlopers, but I’ll keep saying it anyway just to satisfy my own conscience.

    Almost forgot. Here I a link to Mr. Whitlow’s article mentioned above.:

    https://identitydixie.com/2019/07/20/the-gop-nathan-bedford-forrest-and-murder-by-papercuts/

    Good post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Terry, thanks for the comment and for linking to the Whitlow piece, very good and apropos here. Somehow I thought Identity Dixie had been taken down?! I am glad to see they are back up if they were down.

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      1. They were completely down for a few days, and their comments were down for several days afterward, but have been fighting their way back and providing daily content.

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  3. I recently drove from Florida to Wisconsin by way of Georgia, So. Carolina, Tenn, and Ky. Every midsized and larger city looks the same. There’s nothing unique anymore. Bigbox stores, McDonalds, Waffle House, freeways, gas stations, strip malls. Gay flags, Refugee welcome signs, and other such nonsense. If you dropped me in North Georgia or Minnesota I could only tell you where I was based on whether the strip mall has an IHOP or a Waffle House. “Commercialized culture” has ruined not just Dixie, but all of America. A friend of mine from Argentina recently went on a cross-USA trip and noted that every place felt the same, but adjacent towns in other countries feel different. Rather than solely blaming in-migration, or mass media, the blame should be expanded to incessant commercialism.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You are so right about the sameness of most places, in the South (sadly) but also the rest of the country. I remember when each place had a unique character, and there was so much more variety and real ‘diversity’. You knew where you were, and it was mostly local businesses not national franchises, strip malls, etc. I suppose there are still pockets in remote areas where things haven’t changed entirely but for the most part it’s just as you say.
      And yes it is commercialism that is mostly to blame though it is true that some areas have been ‘ethnically cleansed.’

      Liked by 1 person

    2. It is sad to think how things are changing. In another generation or two, this beautiful country of ours will have lost its distinctive civilization and become no better than a nation of Yankee shopkeepers.

      The Wartime Journal of a Georgia Girl, pg. 351, by Eliza Frances Andrews

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