Southern tradition: Black-eyed peas on New Year’s

I know New Year’s Day is past, but at Identity Dixie, I read an interesting and historical piece on why Southerners eat black-eyed peas on New Year’s day. I was always told it was ”good luck”, but there is more to this custom.

I learned some history from reading the piece. And it makes you think about the importance of ”culture, people, identity.”

 

Celebrating our independence

I trust you all enjoyed a pleasant Independence Day, though with each year the question “just what we are celebrating?” insistently recurs in my mind.

For a lot of Americans it seems as though we are celebrating just out of habit, or just for the sake of celebrating — with the customary fireworks, barbecues, parades — but for some of us the day has assumed overtones of mourning — mourning what has become of our country, mourning for what should have been but now is not.

If we choose, we can look back at the genuine accomplishments and heroism of our forefathers in creating this country, though it seems fewer Americans each year are inclined to do that. Cynicism on the part of many on the right is the order of the day, and I seem to see as much bitterness towards our forebears from the ‘right’ as from the left. No matter which way you cut it, that is sad. No matter how wrong America has gone in this ‘grand experiment’ that we call our country, is there really any comfort in denouncing the Founders of this country? Does it serve any useful purpose? I say it doesn’t; if we are truly ethnonationalists or ethnopatriots there has to be something in our history and our folk that we can love and defend. Of course we have to separate our nation (and our folk; they are one) from our government, which does not represent us, nor does it seem to care about our safety and happiness.

But must we trash the past and the people who made our country? I can’t take part in that, though I am decidedly not one of those people the right (and left) disparage as ‘patriotards.’

Even the use of names like ‘patriotard’ is an example of jaded cynicism, something I dislike, especially if I find it growing in my own heart.

Pat Buchanan, in a very good article, asks the question of whether we are still a nation. In my opinion it’s one of the best things he’s written lately, though I often felt he did not ‘go far enough’ in the past in addressing some issues.

I think most of us would agree that the country, as we know it today, does not embody a true nation, a people descended from a common ancestry and with shared history and culture. But there is still a core, a remnant, that exists. Those who are part of this know it, and it is to this that we should and must be loyal. Cynicism and bitterness are not motivating influences; instead they seem to lead to apathy and resignation, and to a perverse kind of superiority feeling based on being above the simple-minded ‘normies’ or ‘Murkans.’ Nothing positive can be built on this.

I don’t know what the future of this ‘Republic’ of ours holds; I am sorry to say I am not as optimistic as I once was (though my optimism was always cautious and tempered by realism). I don’t know that we have any cause to celebrate on Independence Day except to remember our forebears and their great efforts and sacrifices for our benefit, and the fact that their posterity failed to ‘keep’ the Republic they created for us is to our discredit, not theirs.

 

Easter being phased out?

Is Easter the next Christian holiday to be suppressed? CBN News reports that the major candy makers have taken the word ‘Easter’ off the packaging of the traditional Easter candies.

“Hershey’s, M&M’s, Lindor, Russell Stover, Dove, Rolo, and Twix have all produced Easter themed candy without mentioning the word on the front of their candy, according to a press release from the Liberty Counsel.

[…]”Earlier this month, Cadbury dropped the word “Easter” from the advertising of its annual “Cadbury Easter Egg Hunt”  in England.  As CBN News reported, the new “Cadbury’s Great British Egg Hunt” caused an uproar in the church and the government.”

Some Christians will say this is fine with them because Easter is really a ‘pagan’ holiday, or at least the secular aspects of it, such as Easter bunnies, eggs, and baby chicks are pagan fertility symbols. The same people would probably say they don’t believe in Christmas trees, Santa Claus, and all the modern trappings of Christmas. And truth be told, all these things are not Christian in any real sense, though they have traditionally been part of our celebrations.

Personally I am on the fence about this; I can see the viewpoint of those who say Christians should keep to the religious symbols and avoid the secular and pagan aspects. However I still object to the obvious ‘war’ on Christian holidays and the symbols thereof, even if some of our traditions date to the pre-Christian generations of our European ancestors. To let the secularists and the anti-Christians do this without any opposition or objections is capitulating to their agenda.

And the companies who are purging the name ‘Easter’ as well as other Christian holidays from their products and advertising should be made to feel the pain of losing their Christian customers’ business.  However so far it seems that most boycotts by Christians have proven somewhat ineffectual overall; the Christian faith is still losing out to corporate anti-Christian policies.

This kind of incident is also symptomatic of the corporate world’s disregard for their customers and their indifference to their customers’ satisfaction and goodwill. How many have noticed that most consumer products and services have declined markedly in quality?  I know I’m not the only one who perceives this change. Once upon a time (long ago), businesses supposedly believed in the old adage ‘the customer is always right.’ I doubt the businessmen really believed that, but reputable businesses tried to build good relationships with their clients and customers. Nowadays, if you are unhappy with a product or a service, you can complain, but complaints, no matter how politely and articulately they are made, are usually met with indifference at best, and with surly defiance at worst. Businesses generally let it be known that they are ‘sorry’ you are not happy, but that they ‘feel’ that their products and services are adequate, and if you believe otherwise, you are free to do business elsewhere.  ‘This is what we offer; take it or leave it. We’re satisfied that we are doing a good job” is the implicit message.

Most products, American-made or foreign-made, are shoddier, flimsier, less durable, and often uglier than those made a few decades ago. Foods are of much poorer quality, and I’ve heard this from many people.

There is a general breakdown of trust between businesses and their customers. Apathy if not downright hostility is all too common. This business of eliminating Christian symbols and names from products made purposely for a Christian market makes no sense whatsoever. But it’s to be expected, sad to say, in a society in which the traditional common culture and shared customs have almost disappeared.