Where did it start?

While going through some files I saved from the Internet, I came across a blog comment left by a pseudonymous poster, referring to a certain controversial blogger. The date of the comment is not noted, but the comment was from at least a year ago.

The commenter says this controversial blogger is “at it again. Apparently it’s not the (((YKW))), it’s the boomers who are “to blame for all the ills of Western Civilisation.”

The comment says that “Paxman”, apparently British TV presenter Jeremy Paxman, had ‘pushed’ the narrative slamming the postwar “boomer” generation as the “most selfish generation”. Paxman even wrote a book on the subject and has gotten a lot of mileage from that trope. Others, seeing the money being made by such books, have piled on to make some of that filthy lucre for themselves .

Paxman is himself of the hated generation; is he just trying to fend off any attacks on himself by pointing the first finger at his own generation, signalling that he is not one of the evil, sociopathic boomers, but one of the good guys, by joining in the attack?

So Paxman was one of the first to kick off this generational war. But the blog commenter writing the comments that provoked this piece implies that Andrew Anglin was the one who has popularized the meme among the young male right, or the Alt-Right as it was, on the Internet. There’s always been talk that Anglin was a shill or a provocateur, and now there has been considerable discussion in some quarters of some new facts that have come to light, and it seems the consensus is that he is/was a shill or provocateur.
The over-the-top rhetoric and behavior seems to lend validity to that idea, and now his own words seem to confirm it.

Anglin and company aside, it seems this whole boomer-bashing meme was meant as a divide-and-conquer tactic, just as the commenter notes. He said that the meme became much more popular about 5 years ago, when various media (and Internet figures, too, by the way) people ‘began running with it.” And again, as I keep asking, who benefits? Who would benefit?

So here we are: mainstream [leftist] media people like Paxman, along with people who have popular and influential blogs, launched this meme. So its origins are suspect, as being ‘astroturfed’, sown by people with an agenda. And it seems to have been popularized, by lefty media personalities (aren’t they all leftist?) and Internet personalities with dubious backgrounds.

However it caught on like wildfire, despite its being ginned up by the dishonest media and other on the Internet with agendas.

But doesn’t its popularity and persistence show that it struck a nerve, or rang true for many young people, who are deeply in debt, usually student loan debt?

Not necessarily. Envy is unfortunately a tendency we fallen humans are prey to. I know people who incurred huge student loan debts in pursuing a fairly useless degree. I know some who went to 4 different colleges and spent about 10 consecutive years being professional students. I don’t think boomers or anyone else is responsible for that. But it’s nice to have a scapegoat and an excuse to be envious of the loathsome boomers and their contriving to be born in an easier and bettter time.

Scapegoats are a necessity for a lot of people in this present darkness. And a victimhood mentality, accompanied by the chip on the shoulder, is very popular these days, popularized by the left and their various clients.

No surprise, then, that the left and various (((shills))) on the faux right are involved in this particular smear campaign.

Another interesting fact: the baby-boom generation is the largest cohort of White people, by generation, in the West. When they are gone, following the older Silent Generation, the bashers will cheer their disappearance. But then the younger generations will be further isolated, and probably greatly outnumbered. Something to remember.

The rhetoric is very ugly at times, wishing death on ”boomers” and implying the need for ‘culling.’ It’s all out there in various sources if you doubt me.

The commenter I’ve alluded to above noted that the people who created this meme were ‘setting up an intergenerational conflict’ , setting our folk against each other.

It’s just one more sad chapter of our susceptibility to media influence — even among people who insist they do not trust the ‘lying media.’ They are being played by the media now, if they only realized it. But people don’t want to face it. The envy and resentment feel too good, for those who are caught up in it.

This is a topic I wish I didn’t have to address at all. But this division and the internal fractures are so self-destructive. And no one wants to talk about it except those who are keeping the conflict going. Everyone else is silent on it.

N.B.: I haven’t reproduced the comment I allude to because some blogs copyright even the comments, and readers are sometimes warned not to quote without full permisson from the blogg owner and the commenter. I am not sure from which blog the comment came, but it is genuine.

Who ‘runs’ America?

Who is in charge in our country? This is an important question for those who (like many of us) are appalled and horrified by the direction of our country. Who is to blame? To whom can we assign responsibility for the decisions that are being made, ostensibly in ‘our’ name?

Most of us who grew up in the old America, the America that was and is no more, were imbued with the idea that we, the people, were ‘in charge’; that elected officials were ‘working for us’, being paid by us. Most of us no longer believe that; how is it possible to believe that the American citizen has power in this country, when we’ve seen our elected officials, at the highest levels, ignoring our expressed will, and seemingly doing the bidding of other interests?

For some people, The Jews are the real power, albeit indirectly or covertly. Others (strangely) still identify some kind of mysterious WASP ‘elites’ as being in control. Some people refer to ‘New England Yankees’ as a powerful cabal, though there are few colonial-stock Yankees in New England anymore.

Lately a great number of people on the right subscribe to the idea that ‘Boomers’ are and have been in charge, and that they are therefore to blame for the situation we are in. This idea is a recent one, relatively speaking. I started blogging in 2006 and I don’t remember hearing this meme then. It’s only caught on in the last several years at most. Yet it’s become strongly ensconced in the minds of many on the right.

It would be interesting to trace this meme, to follow it back to its source. I posted a comment from another ethnonationalist blog which named a few bloggers (on the right) as the likely source, but who knows? Lacking any other explanation I might accept it; I know it has been reinforced greatly through constant repetition on certain blogs, though it’s everywhere now.

I’ve tried, without success, to argue via data (polls, survey results, etc.) to refute the idea that boomers are far-left and that they constitute some kind of powerful force. However I’ve found that approach to be a failure. People seem to be operating out of a visceral dislike rather than a rational antipathy toward their favorite villains. Facts don’t matter; data does not persuade people who don’t want to believe the data.

If boomers were a monolithically leftist group, the gut-level loathing would be understandable.

And even if the charges against them were true, do they ‘run’ America? If so it would be logical to assume that they must be firmly in control of Congress and other such institutions. But at no time does one age group or cohort have exclusive control of Congress. There is always a cross-section of age groups and different generations in seats of power. The 115th Congress, which is the one sitting now, has quite a few very old members, people like Rep. Conyers, who is 87 years old (and thus not a Boomer), or Reps. Young and Johnson, from Alaska and Texas respectively. I am sure there are other octogenarians in Congress; what about Dianne Feinstein, the oldest Senator, at 83? And how old is John McCain?

The youngest Senator, Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas, is 39. I think that would make him a late Gen-Xer, for whatever that’s worth. So there is a mix of ages and generations in Congress. More demographic data on Congress members is here; it’s of interest that more immigrants are now sitting in Congress, as well as record number of nonwhites and women.

And what of the Supreme Court? Aren’t the ubiquitous Boomers dominating that institution? I think most of us know that there are a couple of octogenarians (pre-Boomers) on the Supreme Court, and according to this article the average age at which they are projected to retire will be 83.

Where else can we look for Boomers? They surely dominate college faculties, don’t they? They are being accused of ‘holding onto’ their jobs past the age when they should be forced out to pasture.

But does anyone seriously profess to believe that one age group can exercise so much influence in the important spheres of life? Some ‘anti-anti-Semites’ have accused those who warn against Jewish influence of attributing near-superhuman powers to Jews. It seems there are just as many people who must think Boomers have superhuman powers to exercise so much control over our society.

Simply reading a history book would make it clear that the crisis that has beset all the Western, formerly White-majority countries has its roots far back. It did not originate with Boomers, or even the Silent Generation (many of whom participated in the 60s countercultural movement). It is too facile to accuse any one age group or generation of being solely — or even mostly — to blame. Were all the other generations asleep or completely inert and passive when the Boomers were supposedly doing the dirty work of destroying Western Civilization? Even millennials have for years had the right to vote and to make their voices heard, yet only now are we seeing a percentage of them taking to the streets to oppose the left. Likewise with Gen-X. What was the saying attributed to black militant Eldridge Cleaver? “If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem”? Everybody who is of age has the ability to ‘get involved’ in some way when they see things going down a dangerous path; people of every generation have had their chance to stand up and be counted, to play some part. It’s easy to point the finger at somebody else, and demand ‘why didn’t you stop it?’ or to say ‘it’s all your fault’.

A certain female politician notoriously said ‘it takes a village’ to raise a child. And it takes more than a ‘village’ to destroy a nation, a people, a culture. There is more than enough blame to go around.

And just a reminder for those who note accusingly that the ‘Boomers’ aren’t out on the barricades in these recent skirmishes: Boomers are now elderly, with the oldest being septuagenarians. Actually in the 1990s there were still a good many Boomers who were actively taking part in rallies and protests in border states, where some were assaulted by immigrants or their supporters. I can think of two such cases involving older people being injured. Do the critics really think grandma or grandpa should be mixing it up with violent young immigrants and antifa types? That’s a job for the young and fit. And the opposition has no respect for the aged or those who are weaker — but then few people on either side do.

Some people openly wish harm to Boomers for their ‘sins’, but be patient; at seventy or so, people begin to die of natural causes, as we’ve seen with a few Boomer celebrities recently. Time is catching up with them as with all of us, and the Boomers will be gone soon enough, vacating the role of scapegoat for someone else. And how does this blame game change anything? It doesn’t. It divides us. It polarizes and paralyzes us. We need to regain a sense of common purpose to unify us. We should, for the greater good, be able to put differences aside.

The American Indians lost control of this continent because they were so lacking in unity; our colonist ancestors benefited from the divisions that kept the different tribes at each others’ throats. Somebody is benefiting from our divisions.

And it ain’t us.

 

 

‘D & C meme’

Divide and conquer, divide and rule, as cited by an English commenter on another blog.

2017-05-25_235410

I noticed that this particular meme began some years ago; it wasn’t always widely used. Was it started because of resentments of parents or grandparents of that generation? Was it based on a simple revulsion toward older people generally?

Was it started because those ‘seeding’ it really believed the popular media stereotype of all boomers as counterculturists and ‘hippies’? Or was it deliberately introduced as a divide-and-conquer weapon?

Or was it, as the comment quoted above implies, used as a diversion from other possible suspects? On at least one blog I used to peruse regularly, the former emphasis on the Jewish role has all but disappeared in favor of blaming ‘boomers’ (who are supposedly 100 percent left-wing and ‘cucked’) and WASPs/Puritans (!) and the opposite sex. Some dislike most of their fellow Americans whom they label with derisive names like ‘Murkans’.

Funny how that works. It distracts the attention nicely from some of the actual culprits. So I suspect the ‘D&C’ memes will continue to be used.

In reading British blogs I’ve found the generational warfare meme to be less common; why should that be? The UK had the Sixties madness as well, but somehow there seems to be less evidence of a virulent anti-boomer sentiment there. The real bitterness seems to flourish on this side of the Atlantic. I find this interesting though very destructive of healthy solidarity and ethnonationalism. I get the feeling that some would like a ‘purist’ movement with only the younger generations who are ideologically correct as members, and the rest be damned.

The boomer-bashing meme is so common on many right-wing blogs that really, a content warning ought to be used so that those of us who are disheartened and put off by this stuff could avoid it rather than finding ourselves mired in it unexpectedly.

Ironically, almost laughably, some of the same people who insist that we have to be as one with our brothers in Europe or wherever (because of our common genetics) can’t find much to like about those closest to them. It’s because of this kind of thing that Roger Scruton coined the term ‘oikophobia’, which he mentioned was often part of the adolescent phase of development. Many of us in adolescence resented our elders, who of course were old fogies, hidebound, out of touch, and embarrassing to us, and many of us thought our own country and heritage were so crass and backward compared with sophisticated Europe. This all sounds strangely familiar, except that it seems to be happening among mature adults in their 30s and 40s who should have outgrown these feelings long ago.

We have to learn to accept our own folk, warts and all, and try to ‘redeem’ those we can, rather than resent or condescend to them — otherwise any kind of ethnonationalism or other nationalism would be a very hollow thing.

 

Note: This blog piece from way back in 2006 deals with oikophobia as well as, in passing, something called ‘Crow-Jim-ism.’ It makes for an interesting read.